Program

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THE SECOND INTERNATIONAL CONGRESS OF POLISH HISTORY

 

 

POLAND IN CENTRAL EUROPE

 

CRACOW, 12-15 SEPTEMBER 2012




PROGRAMME



 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

The Congress is dedicated to the founders of the Cracow Branch of the Polish Historical Society in the 100th anniversary of its establishment



 

 






Important addresses
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Auditorium Maximum, Jagiellonian University, Krupnicza 33

 

 

and

 

 

Collegium Novum, Jagiellonian University, Gołębia 24

Conference-holl of the Jagiellonian Library, Oleandry 3

Room 11, Main Square 8 (2nd floor)

International Cultural Center, Rynek Główny 25

Fontana Room, Krzysztofory Palace, Rynek Główny 35

Editorial Office of Polish Biographical Dictionary, Sławkowska 17

 

 

 

 




Office and registration:

Auditorium Maximum UJ,

Krupnicza 33

 

 

 



Registration:

September 12 (Wednesday)         2.00 pm-9.00 pm

September 13 (Thursday)            7.30 am-7.00 pm

September 14 (Friday)                8.00 am-7.00 pm

September 15 (Saturday)            8.00 am-2.00 pm

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 




PROGRAMME

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 



Language

 

Language of the most of the sessions and discussions is Polish. However, some of them will be held in English. Moreover few speeches are given in German, French, Russian and Czech. Organizers prepared Polish abstracts of foreign language presentations. Speakers as well as disputants will be assisted by translators (consecutive translation). Session „Cracow – a myth and a model of the Eastern-Central European city” is translated simultaneously.


 




SESSION

 

11 September 2012

6.00pm

 



Doctoral forum

The research tools for transnational history: methodological aspects of modern paradigms of historical research (part I)

Room 11, Main Square 8 (2nd floor)

 

Moderators: Iwona Dadej, Katharina Kreuder-Sonnen

 

Doctoral College is a meeting and the workshop designed for young academics dealing with historical aspects of Polish studies and its objective is the exchange of knowledge and experience connected with the ongoing research as well as the discussion about the historians' working methods.

The meeting is inspired by such new theoretical and methodological concepts as histoire croisée, entangled history or comparative theories. This trend of historical research focuses on the process of transfer and relation between events and actors functioning in different backgrounds — local, regional or national.

The crucial question is to analyze the tools necessary for research on historical transnational phenomena, such as research procedures, analysis facilities (such concepts as discourse, network) and sources that require posing questions in this field. We shall likewise discuss whether there are any boundaries for transnational research and whether such research is needed in the modern historiography.

 

 

An introductory lecture

  • Katrin Steffen (Lüneburg), On how to write transnational history: challenges and possibilities of the research method

 




SESSION

 

12 September 2012

9.00am-1.30pm

 

 

 





Doctoral forum

The research tools for transnational history: methodological aspects of modern paradigms of historical research (part II)

Room 11, Main Square 8 (2nd floor)

 

Moderators: Iwona Dadej, Katharina Kreuder-Sonnen

 

Doctoral College is a meeting and the workshop designed for young academics dealing with historical aspects of Polish studies and its objective is the exchange of knowledge and experience connected with the ongoing research as well as the discussion about the historians' working methods.

The meeting is inspired by such new theoretical and methodological concepts as histoire croisée, entangled history or comparative theories. This trend of historical research focuses on the process of transfer and relation between events and actors functioning in different backgrounds — local, regional or national.

The crucial question is to analyze the tools necessary for research on historical transnational phenomena, such as research procedures, analysis facilities (such concepts as discourse, network) and sources that require posing questions in this field. We shall likewise discuss whether there are any boundaries for transnational research and whether such research is needed in the modern historiography.

 

Participants:


  • Iwona Dadej (Berlin), Jagiellonian University and its academic transnational connections in the 19th and 20th c. The outline.
  • Sabrina Lausen (Paderborn), Students and academic corporations as people acting in transnational Polish-German history in the 19th and 20th c.
  • Václav Smidrkal (Prague), In quest of transnational history of socialist militaries
  • Christie Miedema (Amsterdam), The transnationality of West-German and Dutch solidarity with Solidarność
  • Bernhard Struck (St. Andrews): A comment







SESSION

 

12 September 2012

3.00pm-7.00pm

 

 

 






Doctoral forum

The research tools for transnational history: methodological aspects of modern paradigms of historical research (part III)

Room 11, Main Square 8 (2nd floor)

2.30pm-7.00pm


Moderators: Iwona Dadej, Katharina Kreuder-Sonnen

 

Doctoral College is a meeting and the workshop designed for young academics dealing with historical aspects of Polish studies and its objective is the exchange of knowledge and experience connected with the ongoing research as well as the discussion about the historians' working methods.

The meeting is inspired by such new theoretical and methodological concepts as histoire croisée, entangled history or comparative theories. This trend of historical research focuses on the process of transfer and relation between events and actors functioning in different backgrounds — local, regional or national.

The crucial question is to analyze the tools necessary for research on historical transnational phenomena, such as research procedures, analysis facilities (such concepts as discourse, network) and sources that require posing questions in this field. We shall likewise discuss whether there are any boundaries for transnational research and whether such research is needed in the modern historiography.

 

Participants:

 

  • Mila Oiva (Turku), Interpreting Polish Marketing Practices from Transnational Perspective
  • Katharina Kreuder-Sonnen (Gießen), Microbs on a journey: On conceptualization of the assumptions of knowledge transfer between Berlin and Warsaw on the basis of Actor-Network theories
  • Sarah Czerney (Weimar), Historical museums in Poland and Germany as a medium for writing (transnational?) history
  • Katrin Steffen (Lüneburg), A comment
  • Katarina Kreuder-Sonnen/Iwona Dadej: Session summary

 

 

 




Discussion panel

Jewish community in Poland after the Holocaust

 Auditorium Maximum

 Lecture-hall: Medium A

 

Moderator: Edyta Gawron

 

This session is devoted to the history of Polish Jews after the Holocaust in the first decade following the end of World War II. The year 1969 – the time of emigration after “March events” – is assumed to be the date closing the period of direct consequences of the Holocaust and the attempts to revive and sustain various forms of Jewish life in post-war Poland. The session aims at summarizing the researches conducted both in Poland and abroad and confronting them with the post-war background of Jewish people living in East-Central European countries.

The discussion will begin with the presentation of the results of the project “Następstwa Zagłady Żydów. Polska 1944-2010” (“The aftermath of the Holocaust of Jewish people. Poland 1944-2010”), as well as the results of individual research and participants' own experiences. The crowning moment of the discussion will reveal the reflections of the historian who witnessed the events of this period.

 

Participants:

 

  • Monika Adamczyk-Garbowska (Lublin), Presentation of the results of the project “The aftermath of the Holocaust of Jewish people. Poland 1944-2010” (published by Wydawnictwo UMCS in Lublin and Jewish Historical Institute in Warsaw, 2011)
  • Anna Cichopek-Gajraj (Phoenix)
  • Jan T. Gross (New York)
  • Anat Plocker (Haifa)
  • Shimon Redlich (Beer Szewa)
  • Jean-Charles Szurek (Nanterre)

 






Discussion Club: The Middle Ages

The Pantheon of patron saints: Poland and its neighbours in the Middle Ages

Auditorium Maximum

Lecture-hall: Small A

 

Moderators: Zdzisław Noga, Krzysztof Ożóg

The session focuses on the four patron saints of Poland: Adalbert, Venceslaus, Stanislaus and Hedwig of Silesia, who were worshipped in Central Europe. The session is intended to present the papers of researchers from Budapest, Marburg, Prague, devoted to the origins and development of the cult of these patron saints as well as to forms of cult popularization and religious, ideological, political and symbolic issues connected to it.

The discussion following the presentation will bring in Cracow medievists and  will concentrate on various aspects of the cult of patron saints; however, it will principally highlight the role of the cult to integrate the societies of Central Europe as well as to create the culture within the areas of historiography, hagiography, preaching, literature, art and liturgy. The discussion will allow to look at the problem of the cult of Polish patron saints in Poland and abroad in a more interdisciplinary way. It will also furnish an opportunity to exchange research experiences between the historians of Central Europe.

 

Participants:

 

  • Stanislava Kuzmová (Budapest), The cult of St. Stanislaus in Poland and Central Europe in the Middle Ages
  • Petr Kubín (Prague), Středověký kult sv. Vojtěcha v Polsku, Čechách a v sousedních zemích
  • Winfried Irgang (Marburg), Sancta Adwigis … mulier fortis … e stripe generosa – Aspekte der Hedwigsverehrung im Mittelalter

 

The following Cracow medievists will be invited to take part: Waldemar Bukowski, Wojciech Drelicharz, Lidia Korczak, Marek D. Kowalski, Andrzej Marzec, Wojciech Mischke, Zenon Piech, Krzysztof Polek, Piotr Rabiej, Jerzy Rajman, Stanisław A. Sroka, Krzysztof Stopka, Marcin Starzyński, Wiktor Szymborski, Marek Walczak, Anna Waśko, Dagmara Wójcik-Zega, Anna Zajchowska, Maciej Zdanek.

 

 

 




Discussion Club: Early Modern History

Multiculturalism of Polish-Lithuanian Commonwealth in the 16-18th c. – the state and the people

            Auditorium Maximum

            Lecture-hall: Medium B

 

Moderators: Jakub Basista, Bożena Popiołek, Jarosław Stolicki

 

The panelists will discuss the issue of multiculturalism of Poland, where the culture means tradition, customs, artistic creation, role models and cultural aspects of political life (tradition of local parliament, formation of democracy, religious tolerance). The panelists will focus on evaluating these elements of culture which constitute Poland's civilization attainment of that period based on such values as democracy, tolerance or cultural syncretism, but still demonstrating the dark side (xenophobia, cultural isolation, negative models of political systems).  This discussion will also cover the following problems:

-          Political and legal culture of Poland in the 16-18th c. – the model or the anti-model of the political system?

-          Tradition of local parliaments in Poland – the ideal of democracy or the wilderness of the statehood?

-          Multitude of nations and religions– tolerance or force?

-          Polish culture, nobility culture – isolation or cultural syncretism?

-          Role models – the grounds for common mentality.

-          Strange, foreign, an enemy – the perception of foreignness and homeliness in a multicultural country.

 

Participants:

 

  • Hans-Jürgen Bömelburg (Gießen)
  • Cristian Bobicescu (Bucharest)
  • Jurate Kiaupiene (Vilnius)
  • Vitaliy Mykhaylovskiy (Kiev)
  • Andrej Radaman (Minsk)

 

 



Discussion Club: The 19th century

Aspects of the 19th century modernization: Poland and its neighbours. Case studies

            Auditorium Maximum

            Lecture-hall: Seminar Room

 

Moderators: Tomasz Gąsowski, Kazimierz Karolczak

 

The 19th century evoked among some East-Central European elites the feeling of the increasing civilizational backwardness. Industrialized and urbanized West seemed to be moving away from agricultural and rural East. This situation might have led to permanent degradation of this region to the status of a poor market, the source of cheap labour force and mobilization resources for the powerful neighbours in case of war. The new ideas how to stop this process began to appear, and this sparked a debate on which direction the changes should follow. Some of the ideas were implemented in various time, pace and on a various scale. Different priorities were adopted and diverse areas of life (economy, culture, education) were emphasized. These changes had an impact on the life of villages and cities, had repercussions on political and public institutions and on the new forms of religion; they influenced education, ideology, customs and mentality. The new national identity began to grow in the societies, which might be called post-feudal.

How this process developed, which areas of life it involved and in which order, and finally what effects it brought about – these are the problems to be raised in this discussion.

 

Participants:

 

  • Olga Gorbaczowa (Minsk), Memoirs in the Belarusian-Lithuanian lands in cultural tradition of the 19th c.
  • Makoto Hayasaka (Tokyo), Changes in the national identity of Poles in the 19th c.
  • Petr Kaleta (Prague), Czechs in Galicia: society, economy, culture and modernization
  • Marian Mudryj (Lviv), Ukrainian society in the 19th c.: traditional bonds and the challenges of modernity
  • Miloš Řezník (Chemnitz), Polish and Czech national movement in the 19th c. – a typical vs. untypical model for East-Central Europe?
  • Darius Staliunas (Vilnius), Russian government and Poles in Lithuania: assimilation, acculturation, integration, segregation
  • Patrice Dabrowski (Cambridge), Forgotten modernizations: A contribution to the typology of health resorts in the East Carpathians before the First World War

 

 

 



Discussion Club: The 20th century

Polish experience of totalitarianisms of the 20th c. in relation to experience of other Central European nations - unity and uniqueness of experience

            Auditorium Maximum

            Lecture-hall: Conference Hall

 

Moderators: Wojciech Rojek, Piotr Trojański

 

The session's objective is to try to compare experiences of the two 20th century totalitarianisms: Nazi and Soviet, which Poles and representatives of other Central European countries also experienced. The presentation of the research results will offer the starting point for the debate on how far-reaching the unique character of Central Europe is and, on the other hand, where the differences between the communities of this region can be found. The session will be held in the form of a panel discussion. The participants will be invited to comment on the following issues:

-          Unique features of the situation in particular countries;

-          Treating the neighbouring countries and the block as a whole;

-          An approach to dealing with the past;

-          Consequences of totalitarianisms for the situation now: political, social and economic;

-          Personal experience of totalitarianisms.

 

Participants:

 

  • Jens Boysen (Warsaw)
  • Ion Constantin (Bucharest)
  • Detelina Dineva (Sofia)
  • Bruno Drweski (Paris)
  • Jiři Friedl (Prague)
  • Gienadij Matwiejew (Moscow)
  • Miklós Mitrovits (Budapest)
  • Endre Varga (Budapest)

 

 

 



A meeting with the “history witnesses”: Foreign
my own. Narration from inside Belarus

            International Cultural Centre in Cracow, Panoramic Room

        4.00pm-5.30pm

 

A common initiative of the International Cultural Centre in Cracow (MCK-Międzynarodowe Centrum Kultury) and the Centre for Historical Research of the Polish Academy of Sciences (CBH-Centrum Badań Historycznych PAN) in Berlin.

Working language: Polish

 

Moderators: Beata Nykiel (IDE MCK), Robert Traba (CBH Berlin)

 

A meeting with the “history witnesses” from Belarus emerged from a common initiative of the International Cultural Centre in Cracow and the Centre for Historical Research of the Polish Academy of Sciences in Berlin and it intends to introduce the problem which is going to be discussed in the International Cultural Centre the following day, during the session “Heritage and Memory.” The guests invited by organizers are exceptional people with strong ties with the place (Grodno, Zaosie, Wołczyn) and love for history. Their passion, broad practical knowledge and roots in the borderland culture make them a unique source of both knowledge and inspiration for academic historians.

The discussion will concentrate on the history of mutual interaction between the social groups of the cities listed above and it is intended to contribute to a debate on how history functions in the public sphere, especially in the context of the common heritage and memory.

The meeting will provide an opportunity to present Herito - a quarterly devoted to cultural heritage, published by the International Cultural Centre, as well as to promote the Centre's upcoming release on Eastern matters (e.g. a series “Kościoły i klasztory na dawnych kresach Rzeczypospolitej” [Churches and monasteries in the eastern territories (kresy) of Polish Lithuania Commonwealth]).

 

Participants:

 

  • rev. Jan Wasilewski, canon priest, a parish priest in Kamieniec Lit., Wysokie Lit. and Wołczyn (Wysokie Lit., Wołczyn)
  • Anatolij Jewmienkow, director of the Museum-Farmstead of Mickiewicz Family in Zaosie (Zaosie)
  • Józef Porzecki, historian, long-serving vice-President of the Union of Poles in Belarus (Grodno)

 

 

 



Presentation of the new Emil Brix book "Central Europe Re-Visited" ["Z powrotem w Europie Środkowej"]

On behalf of International Cultural in Cracow we invite to a meeting celebrating the release of a collection of essays and sketches by Dr Emil Brix, Ambassador of the Republic of Austria in London, First General Consul of the Republic of Austria in Krakow.

International Cultural Centre in Cracow, „Pod Kruki” Conference room

7.00 pm

 

 





13 September 2012

 

9.00am-2.00pm

 




The inauguration of the Congress

Auditorium Maximum, Lecture-hall: Large A

 


The opening of the Congress

 

Announcement of the results of Polish Historical Society competition „Pro Historia Polonorum” for the best book on Polish history published in foreign language

1. Announcement of the nominations for the Award

2. Presentation of the special award for exceptional contribution to Polish historiography

3. Presentation of the Award of the Senate of Republic of Poland „Pro Historia Polonorum” by the Marshal Bogdan Borusewicz and the statue of Gall Anonim by the Chairman of Jury

 

Presentation of foreign membership certificates of the Polish Historical Society by Krzysztof Mikulski, the President of PHS

 

Presentation of the awards for high school student’s competitions

 

The opening of the Book Fair

 

Opening lecture

Professor Janusz Cisek, secretary of the state in Ministry of Foreign Affairs of Republic of Poland, Poland and Central Europe in formation of the common European identity

 



Discussion panel

A historian in the public space

 

Moderators: Andrzej Chwalba, Krzysztof Zamorski

 

This opening debate concentrates on the role which history plays in the public space of a country. The professors invite the guests: historians, sociologists and culture experts to discuss the phenomenon of “historical politics”, the role of historians in creating historical memory and their attempts to preserve the national heritage as well as the role of history in social life. Furthermore, the participants will discuss quite a common problem in Poland concerning judiciary interference with historians' work, which is manifested in passing judgements on the interpretation of the past.

 

Participants:

 

  • Byung Kwon Cheong (South Korea)
  • Idesbald Goddeeris (Belgium)
  • Satoshi Koyama (Japan)
  • Mykoła Riabczuk (Ukraine)
  • Alex Storożyński (USA)
  • Aleksiej Vasiljew (Russia)



 




SESSION

 

13 September 2012

3.00pm-7.00pm

 





Session

The Future of the Visegrad Group Countries

Auditorium Maximum

Lecture-Hall: Large A

 

Moderator: Senator Janusz Sepioł

 

The year 2011 commemorated the anniversary of the establishment of the Visegrad Group – a strategic project launched on the initiative of Václav Havel, József Antall and Lech Wałęsa. The aims of the Group had been achieved to a large extent. Nevertheless, the initiative has always had adherents and opponents. It has even been announced dead, too early though.

Since the establishment of the Group, the Central European countries have undergone great changes and at the same time their surrounding has changed. Russia has become a different country, the potential of Turkey has changed, the European Union has also changed as a result of new treaties.

The debate on the potential of this region in the period of 20-30 years requires some questions to be asked:

-          Perspectives of stronger integration inside the Group (and/or its enlargement);

-          The scale and the tendency of the influence of superpowers traditionally placing their interests in Central Europe;

-          Directions of changes in home affairs of the Group countries (problems of identity, ethnic conflicts, demographic and social tensions, migrations, relations with neighbours, elite recruitment, etc.);

-          Consequences of various economic scenarios (power industry, transport, tourism, Central European metropolises, etc.);

The analysis of these issues should help to answer the broader questions:

ñ  Are the last 20 years only a happy moment which is “the blink of Central Europe,” which finishes, or is it rather the time of laying a foundation for the new, full of prospects position of our countries in the future world?

ñ  Are there common values that tie them, thus what should be the sense and range of common initiatives in Central Europe?

The discussion will bring together not professional historians, but rather people engaged in public activity:

 

  • Magda Vášáryová (Slovakia)
  • Adam D. Rotfeld (Poland)
  • Csaba Kiss (Hungary)





Session

What is Central Europe? A concept study

            Auditorium Maximum

            Lecture-hall: Medium B

 

Moderators: Andrzej Essen, Irena Stawowy-Kawka

Coordinator: Joanna Janus

 

The session is designed to discuss the concept of Central Europe used in the 20th century historiography and in political journalism in the area “between Germany and Russia,” in West Europe, in Russia, in the Balkans and in the United States.

The papers will be devoted to contexts and meanings this concept was used in. The session will also highlight interwar discussions on that problem, especially the publication of the Czech historian, Jaroslav Bidlo, but also further proposals of Oskar Halecki and Jenő Szűcs. The participants are expected to raise an issue of how the concept of Central Europe functioned both in the international politics in the interwar period and after World War II. Analyzing different approaches of western European historiography and American historiography will allow to pose a question of what influenced the fact that the territory between Germany and Russia was called “Central Europe.”

 

1. Formation of the concept of Central Europe, in geographical, economic, historical and political view from the late 19th c. and in the 20th c., applying a multifaceted approach (history, economy, social and political structure, religion, nations, borders) (basic problem)

 

  • Petr Prokš (Prague), “Mitteleuropa”, “Zwischeneuropa” - German concepts of Central Europe
  • János Simon (Budapest), Rediscovering Central Europe - What has Central Europe meant yesterday and what it means today?
  • Jiři Vykoukal (Prague), The concepts of “Central Europe” of the late 20th century: Győrgi Konrád, Milan Kundera, Timothy Garton Ash, Piotr S. Wandycz, Norman Davies

 

2. The concept of Central Europe – from the outer perspective

 

Central Europe form the perspective of Moscow and Paris

 

  • Aleksandr W. Lipatow (Moscow), The concept of Central Europe in Russian and Soviet historiography and political science in the 20th century
  • Isabelle Davion (Paris), The concept of Central Europe in French historiography and political science in 20th century

 

Central Europe from the perspective of the Balkans

 

  • Gabriela Gavril-Antonesei (Jassi), The concept of Central Europe in Romanian historiography and political science in the 20th century.

 

Central Europe seen from across the Atlantic

 

  • Igor Lukes (Boston), Central Europe – European region seen overseas. The concept of Central Europe in historiography and American political science

 

 

 



Journalists' discussion club

Does Central Europe exist and who identifies with it?

            Auditorium Maximum

            Lecture-hall: Large B

 

Moderator: Janusz Majcherek

 

This debate will host the main publicists from Germany, Austria, The Czech Republic, Hungary and Ukraine, who work in Poland as correspondents or  media workers. The objective of the debate is to present and discuss the issue of the identification of those nationalities with the cultural and historical community called Central Europe. This will serve as a basis for establishing whether such identification is strong enough to create political bonds or community of interests, or even common identity. The choice of panelists reflects an assumption concerning the geographical and political range of Central Europe and it is to serve as a test to verify this assumption.

 

Participants:

 

  • Gabriele Lesser (Germany)
  • Miroslav Karas (Czech Republic)
  • Florian Kellermann (Austria)
  • Péter Kovács (Hungary)
  • Maria Rogińska (Ukraine)

 

 

 

 



Session

History of Poland in foreign history textbooks

            Auditorium Maximum

            Lecture-hall: Medium A

 

Moderator: Adam Suchoński

 

Despite many changes in educational process, a textbook still remains the main tool for teaching and learning history. The current surveys prove that the image of the past learned in school influences how we perceive countries and national communities in the future. For this fact, the participants of this session will present the image of Poland's past which is illustrated in some of the foreign history textbooks currently used for teaching.

While choosing the countries whose textbooks should be analyzed, the organizers followed The International Society of History Teachers'  recommendations to expose in national history the neighbours' past, especially bilateral relations.

The papers will primarily concentrate on political history, history of culture and on the figures important for history, as well as on the ways how issues controversial for modern historiography are presented.

 

Participants:

 

  • Ewa Anklam (Braunschweig), History of Poland in some German history textbooks
  • Pierre-Etienne Penot (Rennes), Polish History in French textbooks
  • František Čapka (Brno), Poland's past in Czech history textbooks
  • Jaroslav Vaculík (Brno), The past of Poland in Czech history textbooks
  • Rastislav Kožiak (Banska Bistřica), History of Poland in Slovak textbooks
  • Tadeusz Gawin (Grodno/Białystok), Poland's past in Belarusian history textbooks
  • Rimantas Miknys (Vilnius), Polish and Lithuanian relations in history textbooks
  • Wladimir Niewieżyn (Moscow), History of Poland in Russian history textbooks
  • Swietłana Falkowicz (Moscow), A comment

 

 

 



Discussion club: Ancient Times

Germanic peoples in Central Europe. Historical and archeological       research. Historical record and tradition later

            Auditorium Maximum

            Lecture-hall: Small A

 

Moderators: Maciej Salamon, Marek Wilczyński

 

The issue of Germanic peoples in Central Europe in prehistoric period sparks ever greater interests among historians and archeologists and it is also gaining popularity among wide circles of history lovers. We wish to analyze what role the Germanic peoples, who settled in the territory of today's Poland and Central Europe during their successive migration stages until the Migration Period, played for the economic and cultural development of those lands as well as for the historical identity of the people living there.

The meeting will begin with short presentations prepared by guests, who wish to analyze:

-          The development and the current state of research on Germanic peoples in Central Europe as an element of research on Germanic peoples in ancient times.

-          Central Europe in the late stage of Migration Period.

-          The problem of Germanic peoples in the mentality and literature of the next generations.

After the presentations, the participants will discuss the position and role of  ancient Germanic peoples in the research into Polish history and history of Central Europe as well as how this phenomenon is described in Central European historiography in various stages of the development of tradition and historical identity. The working language: German, English.

 

Participants:

 

  • Claus von Carnap-Bornheim (Schleswig)
  • Ulla Lund Hansen (Kopenhagen)
  • Piotr Kaczanowski (Cracow)
  • Michael Meyer (Berlin)
  • Walter Pohl (Vienna)
  • Jerzy Strzelczyk (Poznań)
  • Herwig Wolfram (Vienna)

 

 

 



Discussion club

The peripheries of history? Microhistory– gender – oral history

       Conference-holl of the Jagiellonian Library, Oleandry 3    

 

Meeting 1: The state from below. Microhistory of the everydayness

Moderator: Dobrochna Kałwa

  • Guest: Claudia Kraft (Siegen)

 

The meeting will be devoted to microhistory seen as a tool for research into the relations between the authorities and an individual in everyday life. The discussion will start with posing a question of practical possibilities to use methodological proposals and theoretical microhistorical perspective.

 

 

 



Session

Usual and festive rhythm of everyday life in a small town in Poland. The prospects of continuity and change

            Auditorium Maximum

            Lecture-hall: Seminar Room

 

Moderators: Jacek Chrobaczyński, Anna Zapalec

 

The problem to be discussed during this session is often described in historical methodology as microhistory, “closer history,” little homeland or Heimat in German language. The speakers and panelists' presentations will be interdisciplinary in form (social psychology, sociology, anthropology, etc.), which will allow to notice the dynamics and social dimension of “the small town” – a dominant in the historical landscape of Poland both in the Middle Ages, in the Early Modern Period and in the 20th century. The fundamental objective of the presentations is to show the basic aspect of a historical process – the question of continuity and change.

The participants, who are of diverse backgrounds (historians, sociologists, literature experts), will try to present crucial elements and distinguishing features of their own approach to the small town, and they will also formulate  conclusions and research postulates.

 

Participants:

 

  • Jarosław Hrycak (Lviv) – participation in the discussion
  • Grażyna Borkowska (Warsaw), Literary picture of privacy and everyday life of small town residents at the time of partitions
  • Petro Siredżuk (Ivano-Frankivsk), Everyday life in the town Kuty on the Cheremosh in the 18th-19th c.
  • Petr Kaleta (Praga), Everyday life, multiethnicity and multiculturalism of the small towns in Eastern Galicia in the eyes of Czech voyagers in 19th century
  • Robert Pyrah (Oxford), Theatre as a mirror of public and private life in interwar Lwow: tensions between Warsaw-centric national agendas and local concerns
  • Wołodymyr Komar (Ivano-Frankivsk), Everyday life and privacy in the city of Stanisławów under the Soviet and German occupation
  • Olga Linkiewicz (Warsaw), Usual things and everyday matters. Small town society in the light of the Internet research on the memory of the past

 


 

Discussion panel after presentations (chairpersons: Jacek Chrobaczyński and Anna Zapalec):

-          methodological contexts. Research questions

-          source basis

-          dilemmas

-          sociology and psychology in relation to historian's tools to research everyday life and privacy

-          controversies

 

 

 



Session

Polish Jews and Polish-Jewish relations in historiography today

            Auditorium Maximum

            Lecture-hall: Conference Room

 

Moderator: Michał T. Galas

 

The first Polish-Jewish conference after World War II was held in Oxford in 1984. It attracted a lot of Polish and Jewish intellectuals (Cracow was represented by Professors Józef A. Gierowski and Jan Błoński and an editor Jerzy Turowicz). Oxford conference became a breakthrough event which triggered further research into the history of Jews in Poland and Polish-Jewish relations over the centuries in many countries. This conference gave rise to many initiatives, for instance, the foundation of academic centers specializing in this problem at many Polish and foreign universities and in institutions supporting the development of studies on Polish-Jewish relations in Great Britain, USA and Israel. Another important outcome was initiating a yearly publication “Polin. Studies in Polish Jewry.”

The panel discussion is intended to summarize this over 25-year period of the development of research into the history of Polish Jews and the relations between Poles and Jewish people in national historiography. The conference will gather outstanding academics, precursors and witnesses of the events from 25 years ago, as well as young academics from countries and institutions which are leaders in research into Jewish heritage in East-Central Europe.

 

Participants:

 

  • Antony Polonsky (Waltham), Writing the history of Jews in Poland and Russia
  • Daniel Tollet (Paris), Bibliography of European historical works on Polish Jews (from 2000) written in French (France, Belgium, Switzerland)
  • Paweł Maciejko (Jerusalem), Polish Jews in Israeli historiography: selected aspects
  • Šarūnas Liekis (Kaunas), Jewish history and its interpretation in Lithuanian historiography: a comparative perspective
  • François Guesnet (London), Adolescence? The first generation of writers about Polish-Jewish history in postwar Germany, 1968-2012
  • Lyudmyla Sukhareva (Zaporizhia), From Chmielnicki to Petlura: Jews in Ukrainian historiography - the research trends

 

 

 




Student parliament session (part 1)

History of Poland in academic textbooks in Central European countries

         Collegium Novum, Room 56

         3.00pm-7.00pm


Moderators: Paweł Czernich, Łukasz Wiater

 

Student parliament session is a part of the Congress and it is organized by  Academic Association of Students of History at Jagiellonian University and Students' Academic Association of Historians at Pedagogical University in Cracow. The lecturers from various parts of Central Europe will try to answer the following questions:

-          Do academic textbooks show Poland's influence on the formation of international politics over the centuries?

-          Which issues connected with Polish history are most interesting for the Central European university student?

-          How do textbooks show difficult history of Poland and its neighbours?

The topic of the session allows to resign from rigid chronological boundaries and to concentrate on discussing how history of Poland is taught from academic textbooks. The fact that some academic centres show the history of Poland differently in their textbooks will stimulate a discussion on the role of Poland over the centuries.

 

Participants:


  • Martin Klempay (Presov), The image of Poland in Slovak elementary school history textbooks
  • Adam Mesiarkin (Bratislava), Model of ethnogenesis of the Slavic people in Slovak history textbooks, scientific and popular literature
  • Tibor Gerencsér (Budapest), In the eyes of brothers. History of interwar Poland in view of the contemporary Hungarian history textbooks
  • Nataliia Vilchynska (Lviv), The image of Poland (Poles) in the modern university textbooks on the history of Ukraine
  • Anna Varanytsya (Lviv), The image of Poland and Polish people in textbooks on Ukrainian history
  • Camilla Schindller (Munich/Cracow), The image of the Second Polish Republic in German contemporary historiography

 

 

 




Discussion panel

Heritage and memory

            International Cultural Centre  in Cracow (MCK),  “Pod Kruki” Conference Room

3.00pm-7.00pm



Moderators: Jacek Purchla, Robert Traba

 

This discussion panel is devoted to the phenomenon of heritage and memory and is a common initiative of the International Cultural Centre in Cracow (MCK) and the Centre for Historical Research of the Polish Academy of Sciences in Berlin. The subject of discussion and presentations revolves around the problems of the evolution of the concept of national heritage, the confrontation of transnational memorials with national tradition, as well as new perspectives of research on commemoration.

The session is divided into two thematic panel discussions. The first one will be presided over by Hans Henning Hahn and Robert Traba - the coordinators of the project “Polish-German memorials/Deutsch-polnische Erinnerungsorte” and moderated by Miloš Řezník. The debaters will present the results of many years of common Polish and German research together with the publication describing the whole project (8 volumes, 130 authors). The second panel discussion will focus on analyzing material and non-material carriers of memory, regional traditions, the features of the memory of national, cultural and  social minorities.

The session is accompanied by the presentation of the Centre's current offer and upcoming release, particularly the Ministry of Culture and National Heritage scholarship program “Thesaurus Poloniae” and a quarterly publication “Herito”.

 

 

Introduction (ca. 15 min.)

Jacek Purchla, The phenomenon of heritage

The lecture concentrates on the concept of heritage, its evolution and its aspects, e.g. the changes in how material and non-material heritage is perceived, protection of cultural heritage and relations between heritage and memory.

 

Panel 1

National memorials confronted with transnational history of Europe

The debate concentrates on the project “Polsko-niemieckie miejsca pamięci/Deutsch-polnische Erinnerungsorte.” The benefits of bilateral research on the culture of memory. Innovation for the humanities or danger of hypostasis of history?

 

Moderator: Miloš Řezník (Chemnitz)

Participants: Hans Henning Hahn (Oldenburg), Robert Traba (Berlin)

 

4.15pm-4.45pm Coffee break (foyer, 1st floor)

The opening of the exhibition Viribus Unitis? Polish parliamentarians in the Habsburg Monarchy 1848-1918. The exhibition is prepared by the Academic Centre of the Polish Academy of Sciences in Vienna and International Cultural Center in Cracow.

 

Panel 2

Heritage in view of the research on memory

Material and non-material carriers of memory. Regional traditions, the memory of national, cultural and  social minorities.

 

Moderators: Jacek Purchla (Cracow) and Robert Traba (Berlin)

 

Participants:

 

  • Csaba G. Kiss (Budapest)
  • Simona Škrabec (Barcelona)

 

Final comments (ca. 15 min.)

 

The panel is also an occasion for buying the book Polish-German memorials/Deutsch-polnische Erinnerungsorte for a discount price (this is co-organized with the Scholar and Schoenning-Verlag publishing house).

 

Upon showing the Congress identity card, participants will have an access to MCK Library – the library specializing in the problems of cultural heritage, history of art and protection and management of heritage with a special focus on the region of Central Europe.

The participants of the Congress might also see two exhibitions organized for the purpose of the International Print Triennial Cracow 2012:

-          a retrospective exhibition by Prof. Witold Skulicz, long-serving President of SMTG and MTG, who died in 2009. The exhibition is prepared together with Cracow Academy of Fine Arts and International Print Triennial Society (SMTG) and will be on from 13 Sept. 2012 in monumental cellars of International Cultural Centre)

-          an exhibition by Joanna Piech, a prize-winner of International Print Triennial (MTG) Cracow 2009, organized by MCK and SMTG, displayed in MCK Gallery from 15 Sept. 2012.

Both exhibitions might be visited from 10.00am to 6.00pm.

 

The International Cultural Centre wishes to present the Ministry of Culture and National Heritage scholarship programme “Thesaurus Poloniae” and a quarterly publication Herito, devoted to past times, present times and modern times of national heritage of Central Europe. These offers are addressed to the participants of the Congress for Foreign Scholars of East-Central European and Polish (in historical view the Polish-Lithuanian Commonwealth) history and culture. The publications of the International Cultural Centre might be purchased in the MCK bookshop (Gallery, 1st floor) and at the MC bookstall at the History Book Fair in Auditorium Maximum of Jagiellonian University.

 

 

 




Doctoral forum

The research tools for transnational history: methodological aspects of modern paradigms of historical research (part IV)

            Editorial Office of Polish Biographical Dictionary, Sławkowska str 17

 

Moderators: Iwona Dadej, Katharina Kreuder-Sonnen

 

A meeting with the editor of Polski Słownik Biograficzny (Polish Biographical Dictionary) Agnieszka Biedrzycka

 






SESSION

 

14 September 2012

9.00am-1.00pm

 

 

 




Session

Food, identity, culture

            Auditorium Maximum

            Lecture-hall: Large A

 

Moderators: Tadeusz Czekalski, Jarosław Dumanowski

 

This panel discussion  is devoted to the history of nutrition understood as a research sub-discipline that connects viewpoints and methodology of various humanities. The fact that this session is part of the Congress is a reaction to the phenomenon of great interest in the topic of nutrition in the modern culture, which gives a new sense of humanistic and historical reflection upon nutrition as well as results from dynamic development of this research trend in Europe and the United States.

Despite a great number of publications and conferences on this topic, it is still of marginal importance in Polish research. Historical presentations show the problem of nutrition as part of unspecified “everyday life” or, less frequently, refer to the modernistic programmes of the 1970s published (and finished long time ago) in Annales. Most of such attempts ignore the development of research into nutrition since the 1980s and 1990s which has led to formation of a separate sub-discipline based on historical methods but referring to terminology, sensitivity and discussion of ethnologists, anthropologists, sociologists, experts in history of art and literature.

The objective of this meeting is to approach the problem of nutrition in Poland and Europe from the perspective of the output and methodology of the contemporary historiography of nutrition described in the late 1990s in the model review (such as World Cambridge History of Food), promoted in the European Institute for the History and Cultures of Food  (IEHCA) and described on the pages of professional periodicals.

 

Participants:

 

  • Jarosław Dumanowski (Toruń), Historicity of the taste. Origins and development of cultural history of cuisine
  • Aleksandra Kleśta-Nawrocka (Toruń), Old Polish cuisine yesterday and today. History, memory, tradition
  • Magdalena Spychaj (Toruń), Pavl Severin's “Kuchařství” from 1535. A key to the secret of Polish “Kuchmistrzostwo” [cookery art]?
  • Rafał Hryszko (Cracow), Late medieval confectionery in Poland and its neighbouring countries between the East and West of Europe
  • Jiří Vinopal (Prague), National and cultural aspects of drinks in central Europe: the case of integration of beer into Czech national identity
  • Andrea Wurm (Saarbruecken), Stanislaus Prasmofsky’s “Neues Koch-Buch” from 1671 - A Cultural Transfer from Poland to the German Empire?
  • Rastislava Stoličná (Katowice), Ethnological methods of research into food on the example of Slovakia and Poland
  • Margueritte Figeac (Bordeaux), Le vin de Bordeaux, un symbole de l'attachement des Polonais à la culture française

 

 

 




Session

Poles and their neighbours in Central Europe – political relations and their reflection in historiography (part 1)

            Auditorium Maximum

            Lecture-hall: Large B

 

Moderators: Antoni Barciak, Antoni Cetnarowicz

Coordinator: Stanisław Pijaj

 

The session is divided into two parts. The first one is devoted to the Middle Ages and the early modern period, whereas the other one to the 19th century period. The subject of the papers read out during both sessions covers political history of Central European countries and nations and their relations with Poles and their presentation in old and new historiography. The session will gather famous historians from Austria, Croatia, the Czech Republic, Lithuania, Germany, Slovakia, Ukraine and Hungary.

 

Participants:

 

  • Antoni Barciak (Katowice), The concepts of unification and unity in Central Europe in the Middle Ages in the 20th century Polish historiography (opening  lecture)
  • Martin Faber (Frieburg), Teutonic Knights, Saxonians and Prussians – German-Polish relations in the Middle Ages and the early modern period in view of German historiography
  • Orest Subtelny (Toronto), Polish-Ukrainian relations at the time of Mazepa
  • Zigmantas Kiaupa (Kaunas), Polish-Lithuanian Commonwealth in the eyes of Lithuanians in the past and today
  • Christoph Augustynowicz (Vienna), Habsburg-Polish relations in the 16th-18th centuries
  • Libor Jan (Brno), Political history and the development of internal political system of a monarchy in the Czech lands and in Poland
  • Áron Petneki (Budapest), Polish-Hungarian relations in the Middle Ages and the early modern period with the special consideration of Stefan Batory's reign
  • Magdalena Najbar-Agičić (Zagreb) Antemurale, borderland, bridge... - on the role of Croatia in Europe throughout history. Similarities and differences of the Croatian and Polish case

 

 

 




Session

The portraits of power – the power of portraits. Iconography and propaganda of royal power. Poland in Central Europe – mutual inspirations and barriers

            Auditorium Maximum

            Lecture-hall: Medium A

 

Moderator: Zenon Piech with cooperation of Wojciech Fałkowski


Papers devoted to the issue of royal power, its iconography and propaganda present quite an advanced level in the Central European countries. This might be manifested by numerous monographs, exhibition catalogues, or in some cases by a study. However, there is a tendency of choosing only one country, a dynasty, or a ruler to be studied, often without a broad international context. Polish issues are particularly neglected in such studies. The only exception is the research on the Jagiellon dynasty conducted in Leipzig (Geisteswissenschaftliches Zentrum Geschichte und Kultur Ostmitteleuropas (GWZO) an der Universität Leipzig). The program of the session intends to broaden the research perspective by concentrating on the king and the Polish state and by showing many connections between them, iconography and the propaganda of the power in Central and Western Europe.


Participants:

 

  • Zenon Piech (Cracow), Inspirations and barriers. Iconography of the power of Polish kings in comparison to neighbouring monarchies (an introduction to the session)
  • Dániel Bagi (Pécs), The power of the House of Anjou in view of iconography
  • Stephen Rowell (Vilnius), «Heredes, naturales dominos et paterni splendoris veros succesores». The Jagiellonian dynasty in the Kingdom of Poland and in the Grand Duchy of Lithuania
  • Edmindas Rimša (Vilnius), Symbolism of the power in the sigillography of Vytautas the Grand Duke of Lithuania
  • Dana Stehlikova (Prague), «Regalia et sigilla». Emblems of the Jagiellonian Reign in Bohemia
  • Agnieszka Gąsior (Leipzig), Status and representation of the Jagiellonian princesses at German princely courts



 




Session

Christian churches in the context of multicultural and multiethnic Poland

            Auditorium Maximum

            Lecture-hall: Medium B

 

Moderator: rev. Józef Wołczański

 

This session aims at showing the role of Christians in the formation of Poland's identity. It will present the history of Polish Roman Catholic communities in the 19th and 20th centuries as well as the history of a group of Polish Protestants living in Serbia and their fight for preserving national identity away from their motherland. Other presentations will discuss the ecclesiastical hierarchs exiled as a result of tsar's repressions after national uprisings as well as present the Polish Catholic clergy's contribution to the development of Catholic Church in Latvia after 1945. The analysis of the Polonica stored in the Central Archives of the Jesuit Order in Rome in the context of multiethnic and multireligious Poland will complement the subject of the session.

 

Participants:

 

  • rev. Marek Inglot S.I. (Rome), Polonica for the history of multicultural and multiethnic Poland in the Central Archives of the Society of Jesus in Rome
  • Andris Priede (Riga), Deposit of the Polish clergy in the formation of the identity of the Catoholic Church in Latvia after 1945
  • Dušan Drljača (Belgrade), A toilsome road to Polishness. Micro-community of Slovakianized Polish Protestants in Ostojicevo (Banat Serbia) 1838-2010
  • Aldona Prašmantaité (Vilnius), Cracow diocese – an asylum for exiled priests after the January Uprising: the case of Bishop of Vilnius, A. S. Krasiński

 

 

 




Discussion panel

The editing of historical sources – limitations and perspectives

            Auditorium Maximum

            Lecture-hall: Small A

         9.00am-2.00pm

 

Moderators: Wojciech Krawczuk, Adam Perłakowski

 

This panel discussion is designed to confront various experiences and the current state of knowledge on the editing of early modern period sources. It is undeniable that Belarusian scholars have a different approach to the edition of sources from the Lithuanian ones even though it concerns the same documents, e.g. the Lithuanian Metrica. We would like these approaches to be confronted during our session. The Polish side will be represented by historians who deal with the editing of the Ruthenian sources as well as historians of literature who treat the written text not like a source in a historical meaning, which will allow to present concepts and research trends dominating currently in Polish academic science. The subject of presentations will also cover the usage of source editing in university didactics.

 

Participants:

 

  • Natalia Biłous (Kiev)
  • Janusz Gruchała (Cracow)
  • Aleksandr Hrusza (Minsk)
  • Waldemar Kowalski, Beata Wojciechowska (Kielce)
  • Hubert Łaszkiewicz (Lublin)
  • Aleksandr Małow (Moscow)
  • Elmantas Meilus (Vilnius)

 

 

 




Discussion panel

Poland in East-Central Europe. Historiographic images

            Conference-holl of the Jagiellonian Library, Oleandry 3

 

Moderator: Rafał Stobiecki

 

The subject of interest of the historiographic section is the position of the 20th century history of Poland in the image of East-Central Europe created by Poland's neighbours, but not only by them. This problem covers three contexts: all-European, regional and national. The first one is connected with the image of Europe and the prevailing question to which extent this image encompasses the experience of the people living in the area between Germany and Russia. The second context refers to the history of East-Central Europe and focuses on the problem of traumatic experiences of the 20th century, which provokes thought on the common history of people living in this region. Finally, the third context has its roots in the national history. In this case, such interesting questions arise: how did Poland's neighbours understand their relations with Europe, including East-Central Europe, and how do they understand them? And what role did the 20th century history of Poland play in this perception of common history?

 

Participants:

 

  • Roman Baron (Prague)
  • Hans-Jürgen Bömelburg (Gießen)
  • Leonid Gorizontow (Moscow)
  • Rimantas Miknys (Vilnius)
  • Dušan Segeš (Bratislava)
  • Piotr Wróbel (Toronto)
  • Leonid Zaszkilniak (Lviv)

 

 

 




Session

Variations in the cultural landscape of Cracow in the 20th century

            Auditorium Maximum

            Lecture-hall: Conference Room

 

Moderators: Monika Bogdanowska, Maciej Motak

 

This session discusses the four key stages of Cracow spatial development in the 20th century. In the early 20th c. it was a kind of a city-fortress, a strategic point on the map of the Austro-Hungarian monarchy. This function of the city determined its spatial development. The presentations focus on Cracow fortresses in comparison to other buildings and Eastern European cities. The interwar period was the time of intensive spatial development and of creating the vision of the city in the future. The lecturers will present this vision and local aspirations, as well as the measures taken to protect historical heritage of the city.

A political decision was taken after World War II to build industrial plant which was to change the image of the city by transforming the capital of science, culture and history into the capital of heavy industry. The presentations will be devoted to urban planning, landscape and the social aspects of Nowa Huta project, and finally to the socialist city in a broader European context.

Regaining political independence after 1989 once again made Cracow citizens decide about the vision of their city, which again became the area of self-determination. The final part oft he session is devoted to current problems of the city spatial development, starting with the changes in uniting Europe and ending with aspirations and visions of Cracow in the future.

 

Participants:

 

  • Mykola Bevz, Ihor Okonchenko (Lviv), The ways of development of Lviv fortifications in 18th-19th c. A comparison with Cracow
  • Mykola Bevz, Taras Pinyazhko (Lviv), The architecture of fortresses in Cracow and Lviv in the 19th c. in relation to the construction of fortresses in East-Central Europe
  • Olena Oliynyk (Kiev), The cooperation of Cracow and Volyn architects in conserving of common cultural heritage between the Wars
  • Nathaniel Wood (Lawrence), “Polish Mecca,” “Little Vienna upon the Vistula,’’ or “Metropolitan Cracow”? Visions of Cracow before the First World War
  • Thomas Knorr-Siedow (Cottbus), The Nowa Huta's relation to other "socialist" cities and Western cities of the time, their urban and social aspects, their differences and similarities
  • Katherine Lebow (Vienna), Unfinished Socialism: Nowa Huta's Landscapes, 1949-1989
  • Andreas Billert (Poznań/Frankfurt am Oder), Unequal brothers in Central Europe – the development of cities between the Elbe and the Vistula – Urbanity - Culture - Politics
  • Matthew Benjamin Matteson (Cambridge, Massachusetts), Display and Confrontation: Cracow's International Triennale and the aspirations for architecture in Post-Communist era Poland

 

 

1.00pm – The session will finish with Professor Janusz Bogdanowski’s award ceremony.

 






Session

Cracow – a myth and a model of the East-Central European city

Fontany Room, Krzysztofory Palace

            9.00am-5.00pm

 

Moderator: Michał Niezabitowski

Coordinator: Walery Bubień

 

The session is organized by the Historical Museum of the City of Cracow and concentrates on the research on Cracow as an example of absorption and emanation of diverse contents, experiences and values in the sphere of cultural, ideological and urban exchange between the Central European cities. The myth and model of Cracow, which plays an important role in the historiography of Poland, will be confronted with the history of significant cities of neighbouring countries, particularly from the perspective of the museum narration. The session participants are the representatives of municipal museums from our region: from Leipzig, Magdeburg, Vilnius, Kosice and Lviv. Their presentations will allow to compare the main Central European museums‘ experiences in the research on the history of cities and the manner it is presented. This will contribute to the discussion on how to fulfill the mission of the modern municipal museums in the 21st century.

 

Working language: Polish, German, English (simultaneous translation)

 

Participants:

 

  • Michał Niezabitowski (The Historical Museum of the City of Cracow), Cracow in Central Europe. Absorption – Awareness – Identity
  • Volker Rodekamp (Stadtgeschichtliches Museum Leipzig/The Historical Museum of the City of Leipzig), Cracow – Leipzig. The cities on their common path. Searching for a new museum narration
  • Claus-Peter Hasse (Magdeburger Museen/Magdeburg Museum), Cracow– Magdeburg. Common roots of identity
  • Robert Pollák (Východoslovenské Muzeum/The Eastern Slovakia Museum in Kosice), Cracow-Kosice. European capital cities of culture. The experience of 140 years of the history of the Eastern Slovakia Museum in Kosice and the future of it
  • Jakub Potůček, (Muzeum Umĕni Olomouc/The Olomouc Museum of Art), Nowa Huta – Ostrava Poruba. Confronting Polish and Czechoslovak social realism
  • Bogdan Czajkowski (Lvivskij Istorijski Muzej/The Historical Museum of the City of Lviv), Cracow – Lviv. Common past in the contemporary museum narration
  • Jolanta Karpavičiene (Nacionalinis muziejus Lietuvos Didžiosios Kunigaikštystės valdovų rūmai/The National Museum – Palace of the Grand Dukes of Lithuania), Cracow– Vilnius. In the European family of the cities of Magdeburg Law
  • Roland Perényi (Budapesti Történeti Múzeum/Budapest History Museum), Between the old royal residences. A portrait of Cracow from the perspective of Budapest at the turn of the centuries

 

 

 




Lecture

Robert Kostro, director of the Polish History Museum, Presentation of the Polish History Museum

            Auditorium Maximum

            Lecture-hall: Seminar Room, 9.00am-11.00am

 





Lecture

Maciej Szymanowski, minister-counselor, History in the service of the future. Historical politics and soft power in the contemporary foreign policy – the case of Poland and Central Europe

         Auditorium Maximum

         Lecture-hall: Seminar Room, 11.00am-1.00pm


 

 




SESSION

 

14 September 2012

3.00pm-7.00pm

 

 

 




Session

The position of today's Poland in the region and in the world. Achievements of the past decades and challenges of the future

            Auditorium Maximum

            Lecture-hall: Large A

 

Moderators: Józef Łaptos, Jan Rydel

 

This session looks at the achievements and failures of the period of political system transformation in Poland seen in the mirrors positioned closer and further from its borders, which is in the research conducted by foreign experts in our country and region. Methodological thought accompanying the analyses will take into consideration the role of endogenous and exogenous factors in the history of Poland in this period. The former ones have the asset of achievements and the load of heritage of nearer and more distant past, mirrored in the historical politics; the latter ones refer to geopolitical conditioning which makes from enfant terrible of the Soviet system an important – in our view – East-Central European country in the European Union. Im Spiegel der Anderen the Congress participants both from Poland and from abroad should notice, even more clearly, the directions of the future development of our country.

 

Participants:

 

  • Inessa Jażborowska (Moscow), Perception of Poland in Russia after 1989
  • Frédéric Dessberg (Coëtquidan), La Pologne en Europe vue par la recherche historique et politique française
  • Jai-Joon Hur (Seul), Central European countries from Koreans' perspective: sympathy, respect and production
  • Pierre-Frédéric Weber (Szczecin), State and Memory. Historical politics in the 20th c. in Poland and in France
  • Utako Okano (Osaka), Katyn. Reception of the massacre in Japan
  • Jarosław Hrycak (Lviv), Changes in East-Central Europe from the Ukrainian perspective
  • Maren Roeger (Warsaw), Debates about the culture of memory in Poland and neighbouring countries after 1989
  • Iskra Baeva (Sofia), The Role of Poland for the Erosion of the Soviet Model of Socialism in Eastern Europe







Session

Poles and their neighbours in Central Europe – political relations and their reflection in historiography (part 2)

            Auditorium Maximum

            Lecture-hall: Large B

 

Moderators: Antoni Barciak, Antoni Cetnarowicz

Coordinator: Stanisław Pijaj

 

The session is divided into two parts. The first one is devoted to the Middle Ages and the early modern period, whereas the other one to the 19th century period. The subject of the papers read out during both sessions covers political history of Central European countries and nations and their relations with Poles and their presentation in old and new historiography. The session will gather famous historians from Austria, Croatia, the Czech Republic, Lithuania, Germany, Slovakia, Ukraine and Hungary.

 

Participants:

 

  • Antoni Cetnarowicz (Cracow), Processes of development of modern nations in Central Europe and Poles (opening lecture)
  • Hans Henning Hahn (Oldenburg), The Polish issue in the 19th century from German perspective
  • Emil Brix (London), Polish-Austrian compromises in Galicia
  • István Kovács (Budapest), Polish participants of the Spring of Nations and the activity of the Foundation for Supporting Honveds 1867-1870
  • Roman Baron (Prague), Polish-Czech relations in the Habsburg Monarchy in view of Czech historiography
  • Dušan Škvarna (Bańska Bystrzyca), The portrait of Polish history in the early modern period and in the 19th c. in Slovak historiography
  • Ołena Arkusza (Lviv), Ukrainian-Polish relations in Galicia in the second half of the 19th c. and in the early 20th c.: what Ukrainian history tells about and what it is silent about
  • Andrzej Pukszto (Kaunas), Visions of Poland and Lithuania in Polish political thought in Lithuania in 1905-1918
  • Damir Agičić (Zagreb), Political and cultural relations between Poland and Croatia 1880-1948

 

 





Lecture

Artur Dmochowski, New forms of the presence of history: the film and TV

            Auditorium Maximum

            Lecture-hall: Medium A

            3.00pm-5.00pm

 

 

The film and TV play an important role in popularizing history and passing knowledge onto the society. Even such small channels as Discovery History or TVP Historia gather millions of viewers. The participants of the session, historians, authors and critics will analyze interactions between history and the world of the media. The country which deserves special interest is Germany, where the role of a film and TV in history popularization has been quite significant recently. Such mega productions as Ucieczka or Gustloff hit a viewing record there. While discussing this topic, it is quite natural to mention events, processes and so called historical politics common for both nations. In Russia the situation is similar to the one in Germany. A range of mega productions, beginning with 1612 and ending with Taras Bulba, promote the image of Russian history, even with Polish contexts, which coincides with the aims of the historical politics of the state.

 

 




Session

Polonica in the archives of Central Europe

            Auditorium Maximum

            Lecture-hall: Medium B

 

Moderator: Stanisław A. Sroka

 

This session is intended to present polonica from some of the Central-European archives. So far, the research studies have neglected these sources for various reasons. Yet, taking into consideration the relations between Poland and its neighbours over the centuries, polonica in the archives of Central Europe are a valuable source. Some of the sources, e.g. a set of medieval documents from the National Archives of Hungary, are already available on the Internet.

The lecturers of the session are historians and archivists, one from each region of the country. A lot of emphasis will be put on Spis, which was for many centuries in a close relation with Poland and polonica stored in the archives there outnumber any other collections in Central Europe. The subject of the session covers the Middle Ages and the early modern period as well as the modern history. The discussion will also concern the editing of these sources, their digitalization and information spreading.

 

Participants:

 

  • Zuzana Kollárová (Spišská Sobota), Polonica in the Archives of Spis
  • Pavel Krafl (Brno), Polonica in the Moravian Archive in Brno
  • László Szende (Budapest), Les relations médiévales polono-hongroises au bilan des sources diplomatiques hongroises
  • Tadeusz Kopyś (Cracow), Polonica in the Archives of the Ministry of Foreign Affairs of Hungary

 

 

 




Session

Leipzig – Vienna – Cracow – Lviv ca. 1900. At the Crossroads of Music and Culture

            Auditorium Maximum

            Lecture-hall: Small A

 

Moderators: Helmut Loos, Renata Suchowiejko

 

The subject which lies within the participants' interest is the musical life and the cultural and social contexts of it. The lectures show relations in this area between Central European cities – Leipzig, Vienna, Cracow and Lviv – at the turn of the 20th century. Some musical events which prove the intercultural and transnational character of this relation will be discussed. The session also highlights the activity of musical societies (orchestra and singing), artistic education, migration and mobility of musicians and the circulation of repertoire and musical publications. The opening lecture discusses the concept of “Mitteleuropa” used in the historiography of music: the scope of meaning, its functioning, political and ideological conditioning.

 

Participants:

 

  • Helmut Loos (Leipzig), The Concept of ‘Mitteleuropa’ (Central Europe) in the Historiography of Music
  • Stefan Keym (Leipzig), Polish Composers and their Music in the Triangular Network of ‘Musikstadt’ Leipzig: Conservatory – Concerts – Publishing (around 1900)
  • Hartmut Krones (Vienna), Austrian, German and Polish Choirs and Singers in Vienna – Mutual Cultural Exchanges
  • Barbara Boisits (Vienna), Polish students at the Conservatory of the Gesellschaft der Musikfreunde in Vienna
  • Luba Kijanowska (Lviv), Singing and orchestra societies in Lviv as the carriers of European culture
  • Olga Osadcia (Lviv), Polish Theatre of Opera in Lviv in view of the critique of music
  • Renata Suchowiejko (Cracow), Austrian Military Bands in Cracow. Performances – Repertoire – Cultural Context

 

 





Discussion club

The peripheries of history? Microhistory– gender – oral history

           Conference-holl of the Jagiellonian Library, Oleandry 3


Meeting 2: Gender, sexuality and national identity

Moderator: Dobrochna Kałwa

  • Guest: Keely Stauter-Halsted (Chicago)

 

The subject of the meeting is the research potential of the category of sex and sexuality in the research going beyond the narrow meaning of history of women and gender history. The starting point for a discussion will be a lecture devoted to a special case – the research on the national identity in East-Central Europe seen from a gender vantage point.







Discussion panel

Experiences and perspectives of research cooperation in Central Europe

            Auditorium Maximum

        Lecture-hall: Conference Room

 

Moderator: Barbara Klich-Kluczewska

 

The international cooperation on historiography is today inevitable. There is no modern historical science which would not involve a transnational debate possible owing to various forms of cooperation: from host lectures to international projects involving hundreds of academics, doctoral students and regular students. Such a situation gives rise to questions:

-          Which of those forms is the best and the most effective?

-          Which projects have (and will have) the greatest chances for being financed?

-          Will financing institutions have a real influence on the trends in historical research?

-          What role should doctoral studies play in the project?

The meeting is intended to exchange experiences in initiating, creating and implementing new forms of cooperation between the researchers of Central Europe.

 

Participants:

 

  • Iwona Dadej (Berlin)
  • Sofia Dyak (Lviv)
  • Leonid Gorizontow (Moscow)
  • Dietlind Hüchtker (Leipzig)
  • Peter Oliver Loew (Darmstadt)

 

During the panel at 4.30 PM dr. Peter Oliver Loew (Darmstadt) and professor dr Hans-Jürgen Bömelburg (Gießen) will present  the publication project of a “German-Polish History”. The initiators will present its outlines as well as discuss its challenges and crucial points. 

 

 




Student parliament session (part 2)

History of Poland in academic textbooks in Central European countries

            Auditorium Maximum

            Lecture-hall: Seminar Room


Moderators: Paweł Czernich, Łukasz Wiater

 

Student parliament session is a part of the Congress and it is organized by  Academic Association of Students of History at Jagiellonian University and Students' Academic Association of Historians at Pedagogical University in Cracow. The lecturers from various parts of Central Europe will try to answer the following questions:

-          Do academic textbooks show Poland's influence on the formation of international politics over the centuries?

-          Which issues connected with Polish history are most interesting for the Central European university student?

-          How do textbooks show difficult history of Poland and its neighbours?

The topic of the session allows to resign from rigid chronological boundaries and to concentrate on discussing how history of Poland is taught from academic textbooks. The fact that some academic centres show the history of Poland differently in their textbooks will stimulate a discussion on the role of Poland over the centuries.

 

Participants:

 

  • Yuri Hryvnak (Ivano-Frankivsk), The image of Poland in the Middle Ages and in contemporary history in Ukrainian academic textbooks (1991-2012)
  • Volodymyr Mirchuk (Ivano-Frankivsk), Modern and contemporary history of Poland 1795 - 2010) in Ukrainian academic textbooks (1991-2012)
  • Tomaš Božerocki (Vilnius), The Presentation of the 10-15th century History of Poland in Lithuanian Syntheses
  • Justinas Guobys (Vilnius), The Presentation of the 16-18th century History of Poland in Lithuanian Syntheses
  • Antanas Jonušas (Vilnius), The Presentation of the 19-20th century History of Poland in Lithuanian Syntheses

 

 





SESSION

 

15 September 2012

9.00am-1.00pm

 

 

 




Session

Common or distinct experience? The comparison of migration of Poles and other nations in the world

            Auditorium Maximum

            Lecture-hall: Large A

 

Moderator: Adam Walaszek

Coordinator: Jan Lencznarowicz

 

This panel session is intended to compare the 19th and 20th c. experience of migration of Poles and other nations as well as to compare the history of immigrants in the countries they settled down with respect to their acculturation. This will help to try to answer quite a basic and classical question: To what extent are migrations of Poles unique and to what extent are they a universal phenomenon which should be explained in the context of world demographic and economical processes, of the core-periphery theory, the social capital, etc.?

The area of discussion should and must go beyond the area of Central Europe, which results from the subject of research. The discussion will also be devoted to the interethnic relations between the representatives of various groups  from this area. The participants are outstanding historians of migration, representing various nationalities and academic centres, who have been involved in comparative studies for many years.

 

Participants:

 

  • Dirk Hoerder (Salzburg), Migrant Decision-Making and Life-Projects in the Frame of Macro-regional Power Hierarchies, Migration Systems, and Diasporas (opening lecture)
  • Annemarie Steidl (Vienna), Migration experiences of Poles in the US in comparison to other migrants from Austria-Hungary, 1880-1914
  • Pien Versteegh (Tilburg), Polish mining communities in the Netherlands and Germany, 1890-1940
  • Xosé M. Núñez Seixas (Santiago de Compostela), The other Galicians: Ethnicity and social experience of migrants from Iberian Galicia in Latin America
  • Ryszard Stemplowski (Cracow), Identity as a function of immigration. Poles, Ruthenians, Scots, Ukrainians, Walsh, Italians, and Jews in Latin America (1850-1950)
  • Thaís Janaina Wenczenovicz (Erechim), Historiography of Polish immigration: a prospective assessment of the studies about Rio Grande do Sul
  • Serge Cipko (Edmonton), The Ukrainian Experience in Argentina, 1897-1950

 

 

 




Session

Instruments of expansion of the superpower in Central Europe

            Auditorium Maximum

            Lecture-hall: Large B

 

Moderators: Marek Ferenc, Andrzej Nowak

 

The participants' area of interest is Poland and its neighbours (Poland, Lithuania, Russia, The Ottoman Empire, Hungary, The Czech Republic, Germany, Denmark, Sweden) from the Middle Ages to the early 20th c. The leading topic of the discussion is the functioning of superpowers as well as the power status in Central Europe. The organizers of the meeting aim at signalizing the research problems arising out of this topic and will try to deal with them. The most important issues for the debate are as follows:

-  Superpowers in Central Europe - the meaning of the concept, the role of Central European superpowers (in the region, in Europe, in the world);

-  Instruments of superpowers' ideology and politics in Central Europe (geographical, political, military, demographic, social, economic, cultural and religious);

- Sarmatism. Searching for the identity of nobility or “the dream of the power”?

The participants of the session are historians from Belarus, Lithuania, Germany, Russia, Turkey, Ukraine, Hungary and Great Britain. Each lecture is to be followed by a discussion and the whole session will be summed up with a final discussion.

 

Participants:

 

  • Richard Butterwick (London), A religious factor in the partitions of Poland
  • Michaił Dmitrijew (Moscow), Confession factors in the expansion of superpowers in the 17th c. (comparison of Poland and Russia)
  • Konstantin Erusalimskij (Moscow), The Emperor of the Duchy of Prussia, Emperor August's brother, in Russian and anti-Russian propaganda of the second half of the 16th c.
  • Natalia Jakovenko (Kiev), The idea of primogeniture of the Roxolani in “the common Sarmatian motherland” as a specific resistance to the expansion of superpowers
  • Andrej Januškevič (Minsk), The participation of the Great Duchy of Lithuania in the Livonian War – a forced action or the ambitions of the superpower?
  • Gediminas Lesmaitis (Vilnius), Defence possibilities of the Grand Duchy of Lithuania in the second half of the 16th c.
  • László Tapolcai (Budapest), The myth of expansion – the expansion of the myth. Medieval myths of territorial expansion and their perception in the modern national historiographies in East-Central Europe
  • Hacer Topaktaş (Ankara), Was the existence of Poland indispensable for the future of East-Central Europe in the 18th c.? The view form the perspective of the Ottoman Empire
  • Hans-Jürgen Bömelburg (Gießen), Instruments of the expansion of the        superpower: Poland in the comparative context (The Holy Roman Empire, the House of Habsburg, Sweden)

 

 

Accompanying events:

“Kircholm 1605 – the battle for the domination of the Baltic Sea,” wargaming presentation in Auditorium Maximum JU, as part of the presentation of the new forms of learning and practising history

 





Session

Traces of the Avant-garde – art and architecture of Central Europe after 1945

            Auditorium Maximum

         Lecture-hall: Medium A


Moderators: Wojciech Bałus, Andrzej Szczerski


The session presents new interpretations of the avant-garde artistic  programmes in art and architecture of Central Europe after 1945, in the context of the changing political and cultural situation. The participants will refer to both the times of Communism and the end of transformation after 1989, with special attention to artistic phenomena, which so far have been neglected in academic papers. On the one hand, the participants will discuss the role which the avant-garde played in the official cultural politics of the Communist countries so that they will highlight these areas of artistic experiment which did not lie within the accepted 'social-modernist' modernity. On the other hand, they will discuss the references to the interwar avant-garde in the local art after 1989, both in the artistic practice and in the activity of artistic institutions. The subject of the analysis will also cover the notion of 'Central Europe' and its meaning in the contemporary 'global' history of art.

 

Participants:

 

  • Piotr Piotrowski (Poznań/Berlin), Globalizing Central European Art
  • David Crowley (London), Sounding the Body Electric. Experimental Art and Music in Eastern Europe in the 1960s
  • Jeremy Howard (St Andrews), Grade School or School-Garde
  • Andrzej Szczerski (Cracow), Modernism rediscovered - on interpretations of modernist legacy in Central European art after 1989
  • Arnold Bartetzky (Leipzig), Architectural Reconstruction in the 20th and 21 century. European Perceptions of the Polish Model
  • Barnabas Bencsik (Budapest), Collecting and exhibiting Polish contemporary art in Central Europe - the case of Ludwig Museum in Budapest

 

 

 




Lecture

Marcin Bochenek, head of NASK, New forms of the presence of history: the Internet

            Auditorium Maximum

            Lecture-hall: Small A

            9.00am-11.00am

 

 

Owing to modern technologies history reaches us not only through school, textbooks, books, lectures, but it is also present in the virtual reality. Computers, tablets and mobile phones are becoming the carriers of historical knowledge, both serious academic papers and various texts written by passionates. The digital world allows to present history in an innovative way (e.g. the topic of little motherland), which is a chance for presenting extraordinary topics, which serves as a place for fast and ongoing information exchange, and finally, which provides access to many sources and publications  unreachable so far. What's more, it offers possibility to present freely opinions and information.

The meeting is an opportunity to raise questions of the presence of history in the digital world today, credibility of this form of communication and new approaches to past and new topics arising out of this phenomenon. The discussion will also focus on the role of professional historians in the digital world.

 




Lecture

Andrzej Mietkowski, director of Polish Radio web portal, Sound archives in the web - historical websites of Polish Radio

           Auditorium Maximum

            Lecture-hall: Small A

            11.00am-1.00pm

 

 




Discussion club

The peripheries of history? Microhistory– gender – oral history

            Conference-holl of the Jagiellonian Library, Oleandry 3

 

Meeting 3: Oral history, memory and violence

Moderator: Dobrochna Kałwa

  • Guest: Andrea Pető (Budapest)

 

The subject of the meeting is oral history seen as a tool for historical research on the collective memory. The discussion will focus on the characteristic features of the oral history and its areas of research and it will be preceded by the lecture on memory and violence in historical research.

 

 

 




Directors' club

Presentation of university institutes of history

            Auditorium Maximum

        Lecture-hall: Conference Room

 

Moderators: Zdzisław Noga, Stanisław A. Sroka

 

The meeting of the directors of institutes of history from Central Europe is designed to enable the exchange of opinions on the problems currently discussed in university circles which concern the organization of historical studies and academic research. The discussion will concentrate on the following issues: Bologna system of education, common research projects, double MA diplomas and the students' exchange.

The meeting will be an occasion for the exchange of experience in educating history students in Central European countries after implementation of the Bologna system, which has changed the form of studies applied so far. The possibility to get double diplomas together with the intensive exchange of students and professors entails the formation of the European educational space. International research projects manageable owing to the new possibilities offered by united Europe are equally crucial.

The meeting will bring together directors of the institutes of history form Polish universities as well as from Czech, Slovakia, Ukraine and Hungary. We do hope that this debate will bear fruit and promote academic contacts between Central European countries as well as intensify the exchange of students, doctoral students and academic staff.

 

 

 




Session

Organizations to support the research and history studies in Poland and Central Europe

        Auditorium Maximum

        Lecture-hall: Seminar Room

 

Moderator: Marek Wilczyński

 

Session presents national and foreign institutions which help to establish contacts and conduct research on history, culture and social issues of Poland and Central Europe. The participants will discuss the following forms of assistance to foreign academics and students in establishing contacts and launching research:

- Financial support (assistance in study tours for foreign students coming to Poland);

- Organizational support (representation and advice on establishing contacts and searching for possibilities to launch research and studies of history and Polish culture in Poland and abroad);

- Substantive support (providing access to library resources, databases and information promoting the study of Polish culture and history).

 

 

Institutions which will be represented at the meeting:

 

  • Centre for Historical Research in Berlin (Robert Traba)
  • University Viadrina Frankfurt / O (Dagmara Jajeśniak-Quast)
  • Deutscher Akademischer Austauschdienst, Außerstelle Warschau (Peter Hiller, Katarzyna Kosylak)
  • Deutsches Polen Institut Darmstadt (Dieter Bingen)
  • Foundation for Polish Science (Włodzimierz Bolecki)
  • Foundation for the Development of the Education System (Anna Atłas)
  • Polish Academy of Sciences, Centre in Moscow (Mariusz Wołos)
  • Polish Academy of Sciences, Centre in Rome (Leszek Kuk)
  • Polish Academy of Sciences, Centre in Vienna (Bogusław Dybaś)
  • Polish-German Youth cooperation (Stanisława Piotrowska)
  • Russian Institute for Cultural Research in Moscow (Aleksiej Vasiljew)
  • State Pedagogical University in Moscow (Sergiej Zasorin)

 

 






15 September 2012

 

 

Offical closing ceremony

 

Auditorium Maximum

Lecture-hall: Large A

2.00pm-4.00pm




 

 

         The Wacław Felczak and Henryk Wereszycki Award Ceremony


 

 


Maciej Salamon, Summing up the Second International Congress of Polish History



Closing remarks by Professor Janusz Cisek, secretary of the state in Ministry of Foreign Affairs of Republic of Poland



 

 

 



 




Accompanying events:

 

Events organized by Fair in Cracow (free entrance):

 

13-15 September, Auditorium Maximum:

Historical Books Fair

 

13 September, 4.00pm, Auditorium Maximum, Exhibition room

Presentation of diplomas for the winners of plebiscite "Historia Zebrana" [Collected history] for the best book of the first half of 2012. Organizer: Histmag.org.

 

13 September, 1:00pm-2:30pm, Auditorium Maximum, room: Small A

Presentation of the offer of Bellona S.A. publishing house for the second half of  2012. Organizer: Bellona S.A. Meeting dedicated to booksellers.

 

15 September, 11.00am-1.00pm, Auditorium Maximum, room: Medium B

Debate on history in the Web and historical politics. Organizer: historia.org.pl and historical forum historycy.org.

 

 



Events for registered Congress participants:

 

13 September, 8.00pm

Organs music concert in the St. Marry Church

 

14 September, 10.00am

Sightseeing of the Old Jewish Cemetery in Kazimierz

 

15 September, 5.00pm

Sightseeing of the exhibition "Traces of European identity of Cracow", Rynek Underground (Historic Museum of City of Cracow)

Sightseeing of the exhibition "Kraków in the period 1939–1945", Schindler’s Factory (Historic Museum of City of Cracow)




Organizer:

Polish Historical Society – Cracow Branch

 



Organization Comitee:

 

Andrzej Chwalba (head), Andrzej Banach, Wojciech Bałus, Antoni Barciak, Jakub Basista, Marcin Bochenek, Monika Bogdanowska, Antoni Cetnarowicz, Jacek Chrobaczyński, Tadeusz Czekalski, Paweł Czernich, Iwona Dadej, Artur Dmochowski, Jarosław Dumanowski, Andrzej Essen, Marek Ferenc, Michał T. Galas, Edyta Gawron, Tomasz Gąsowski, Grażyna Grabowska, Dobrochna Kałwa, Kazimierz Karolczak, Barbara Klich-Kluczewska, Robert Kostro, Wojciech Krawczuk, Jan Lencznarowicz, Józef Łaptos, Janusz Majcherek, Maciej Motak, Michał Niezabitowski, Zdzisław Noga, Andrzej Nowak, Beata Nykiel, Krzysztof Ożóg, Adam Perłakowski, Zenon Piech, Stanisław Pijaj, Bożena Popiołek, Jacek Purchla, Wojciech Rojek, Jan Rydel, Maciej Salamon, Janusz Sepioł, Stanisław A. Sroka, Irena Stawowy-Kawka, Rafał Stobiecki, Jarosław Stolicki, Adam Suchoński, Renata Suchowiejko, Andrzej Szczerski, Robert Traba, Piotr Trojański, Adam Walaszek, Łukasz Wiater, Marek Wilczyński, ks.Józef Wołczański, Krzysztof Zamorski, Anna Zapalec

 

 



Organization Office:

Krzysztof Zamorski (head), Andrzej Chwalba, Marcin Jarząbek, Konrad Meus, Jakub Muchowski, Dorota Pałosz, Maciej Salamon, Łukasz T. Sroka, Stanisław A. Sroka, Marek Wilczyński, Mariusz Wołos, Anna Zapalec

 



Partners:

 

Jagiellonian University

Pedagogical University of Cracow

Polish History Museum

Historical Museum of the City of Cracow

International Cultural Center in Cracow

Fairs in Cracow

 

International partners:

 

Magyar Történelmi Társulat

Sdružení historiků České republiky (Historický klub 1872)

Slovenská historická spoločnost' pri Slovenskej akademii vied

 



Supporting media:

 

Portal of Polish Radio

Polish Radio

Academic forum